The O'Farrell Charter School

Winner of the National Excellence in Urban Education Award

Course Catalog

The O’Farrell High School Course Catalog

 

History/Social Science (“a”) 3 years required

 

Advanced World History

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS WLD HIST 1 AD / F653L , OCS WLD HIST 2 AD / F654L, OCS WLD HIST 2 AD / F654 , OCS WLD HIST 1 AD / F653 , ADV WORLD HIST / H110

Length of Course: 1 year, Grade Levels: 9th, 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of Advanced World History is to study the major themes, events, people, and turning points of the modern world with a focus on the development of government, law, and democratic thought. Students understand the connections and causal or sequential relationships between events, people, and movements. Students understand varying perspectives and worldviews on historical events and movements from the ancient world to present and gain insight on why these complex events and movements happened. Students gain valuable insight into the events and movements of today. Students improve their historical analysis skills (critical thinking) as well as their chronological, cause and effect and spatial thinking skills. Student’s ability to analyze sources for point of view and validity will be developed. This course will develop students’ ability to research and interpret historical evidence.

 

AP Government and Politics United States

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS AP GOV 1 / F677 , OCS AP GOV 2 / F678 , AP GOV / H430

Length of Course: Half year, Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

A well-designed AP course in United States Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students successfully completing this course will be able to: describe and compare important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government and politics, explain typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences (including the components of political behavior, the principles used to explain or justify various government structures and procedures, and the political effects of these structures and procedures), interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics (including data presented in charts, tables, and other formats), critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, apply them appropriately, and develop their connections across the curriculum

 

AP United States History

Transcript Abbreviations: AP US Hist 1 / F659 , AP US Hist 2 / F660

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP U.S. History course focuses on the development of historical thinking skills (chronological reasoning, comparing and contexualizing, crafting historical arguments using historical evidence, and interpreting and synthesizing historical narrative) and the development of students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present. Seven themes of equal importance – American and National Identity; Migration and Settlement; Politics and Power; Work, Exchange, and Technology; America in the World; Geography and the Environment; and Culture and Society – provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. The course also allows teachers flexibility across nine different periods of U.S. history to teach topics of their choice in dept

 

AP World History

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS WLD HST 1 AP / F671 , OCS WLD HST 2 AP / F672 , WORLD HIST&GEO / H100

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 10th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP World History course focuses on developing students’ understanding of the world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present. This college-level course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.

 

Government:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Government / F676 , GOVERNMENT / H400

Length of Course: Half year, Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

United States Government is designed to provide students with an understanding of the influences and founding principles of American democracy as well as their role as citizens within that political system. More specifically, the course focuses on federalism, responsibilities of each branch of government, mass politics, the influence of media on the general public’s political opinions, and civil liberties. As high school seniors, students taking an American government course are ready to embark into the adult world. Their study of citizenship and the duties of each branch of government provides them with the ability to be active participants their nation as well as understand the rights and privileges they have as American. In completing this course, students understand: the role of a responsible citizen; foundations of American democracy; the dispersion of power amongst the branches of government as well as within the citizenry; federalism and the relationships between local municipalities, states and the federal government; freedoms protected by the Bill of Rights; comparing the struggles for equality amongst minority groups; the formation of an individual’s political thoughts and ideas; the structure of political parties; the role of the candidate in a political campaign; the influence of lobbying and interest groups; bias in the news media; the roles and responsibilities in Congress, the Executive branch, the Judicial branch, and the bureaucracy; and government influence on policy in the arenas of economics, education, the environment, welfare, and foreign policy.

 

US History:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS US Hist / F655 , OCS US Hist / F656 , US HISTORY / H300

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of this course is to study the major themes, events, people, and turning points of the modern U.S. history with a focus on the evolution of political life and societal norms. Students understand the connections and causal or sequential relationships between events, people, and movements. Students understand varying perspectives of groups (ethnic, political, socio-economic, etc.) on historical events and movements from the founding of the nation, the evolution of federalism, the impact of industrialization, urbanization, foreign policy of the 20th century, the civil rights movement to the modern political and economic conditions in the country. Students investigate the events through the lens of constitutional interpretation, race and equality, economic conditions, and shifting foreign policy goals. Students gain valuable insight into the events and movements of today. Students improve their historical analysis skills as well as their chronological and spatial thinking skills. This course further develops students’ ability to research and interpret historical evidence.

 

Contemporary Topics in Social Studies:

Transcript Abbreviations: F677 / OCS Topics Soc Stu 1 , F688 / OCS Topics Soc Stu 2 , CONT SOC STUD / H200

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

This course is designed as a thematic, in-depth discussion class that addresses topics relevant to both today's society and historical societies throughout history. Students spend the year investigating these topics through discussion, reading and writing tasks. It aims to connect these topics to students' lives and encourages students' development in reading, critical thinking, logically sound argumentation, research and clarity of written expression. It is intended to inspire students to civic engagement and further study of questions that affect society today.

 

World History and Geography:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS WORLD HIST 2 / F652 , OCS WORD HIST 1 / F651 , WORLD HIST&GEO / H100

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 9th, 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of World History is to analyze and interpret the major events and institutions that created the modern
world. Special attention is placed on government/ political developments with an emphasis on the development of democratic thought. Students will identify the cause and effect patterns in the events of World History. This study will support functional reading and interpretation skills as well as chronological and spatial thinking skills. These abilities will show an understanding of historical developments and the foundations of modern institutions and will prepare students to participate in society later in life.

 

English (“b”) 4 years required

 

American Literature:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Am Lit 1 / F175 , OCS Am Lit 2 / F176 , AMERICAN LIT / E300

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

American Literature at The O’Farrell Charter High School builds on the rigorous 9th and 10th grade curriculums in order to prepare students to thrive at the university level and in diverse career paths. Using the Common Core ELA standards for Grade 11 as a framework, American Literature drives students to analyze texts rhetorically and articulate intelligent conclusions about fictional and informational texts. Students engage in discussions about complex themes seen across various genres, explore authors’ styles and motivations, and address bias in readings. Students read novels, articles, advertisements, and poems critically, and also write essays, research papers, business letters, professional emails, blogs, and website content to express dynamic ideas in diverse forums. Students write timed essays and full-length essays that are drafted and typed over the course of the year: 5 persuasive, 5 response-to-literature, and 8 expository essays. (The emphasis on expository essays is designed to prepare students to write essays for college applications, scholarship applications, and the EAP.) Students are expected to speak and write eloquently to express individual points-of-view, while citing textual evidence to build academic arguments. An intense public speaking unit requires students to develop advanced communication skills and also to listen actively to peer assertions in order to respond appropriately. In each unit, students are expected to question and analyze content, pushing themselves to think critically about the world around them and the part they play in America’s democracy.

 

AP English Language and Composition:

Transcript Abbreviations: AP Engl Lang 1 / F177 , AP Engl Lang 2 / F178 , AP ENG LANG / E310

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. The course cultivates the rhetorical understanding and use of written language by directing students’ attention to writer/reader interactions in their reading and writing of various formal and informal genres (e.g., memos, letters, advertisements, political satires, personal narratives, scientific arguments, cultural critiques, research reports). Reading and writing activities in the course also deepen students’ knowledge and control of formal conventions of written language (e.g., vocabulary, diction, syntax, spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, genre). The course helps students understand that formal conventions of the English language in its many written and spoken dialects are historically, culturally, and socially produced; that the use of these conventions may intentionally or unintentionally

contribute to the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of a piece of writing in a particular rhetorical context; and that a particular set of language conventions defines Standard Written English, the preferred dialect for academic discourse.

 

AP English Literature and Composition:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS AP ENG LIT 1 / F173 , OCS AP ENG LIT 2 / F174 , AP ENG LIT / E430

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit such as those by the authors listed on pages 10 –11. The pieces chosen invite and reward rereading and do not, like ephemeral works in such popular genres as detective or romance, fiction, yield all (or nearly all) of their pleasures of thought and feeling the first time through. The AP English Literature and Composition Development Committee agrees with Henry David Thoreau that it is wisest to read the best books first; the committee also believes that such reading should be accompanied by thoughtful discussion and writing about those books in the company of one’s fellow students.

 

CSU Expository Reading and Writing:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ERWC / F160 , OCS ERWC / F161 , ERWC / E410

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

The goal of the Expository Reading and Writing Course (ERWC) is to prepare college-bound seniors for the literacy demands of higher education. Through a sequence of eight to ten rigorous instructional modules, students in this yearlong, rhetoric-based course develop advanced proficiency in expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. The cornerstone of the course—the ERWC Assignment Template—presents a scaffolded process for helping students read, comprehend, and respond to nonfiction and literary texts. Modules also provide instruction in research methods and documentation conventions. Students will be expected to increase their awareness of the rhetorical strategies employed by authors and to apply those strategies to their own writing. They will read closely to examine the relationship between an author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and purpose; to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies; and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. By the end of the course, students will be expected to use this process independently when reading unfamiliar texts and writing in response to them.

 

Advanced English 10:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ENG 3 ADV / F156 , OCS ENG 4 ADV / F157 , ADV ENGLISH 10 / E210

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

In order to prepare students for AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition, and to be competitive at four-year university programs, English 3, 4 Advanced gives students the tools and support to listen actively, speak confidently, read critically, and write eloquently. This course also supports students in AP World History by requiring rigorous, timed-writing exercises and cross-curricular analysis. The course prepares students to thrive on the PSATs, SATs, SAT IIs, ACTs, and CAHSEE by examining test formats and expectations in order to implement strategies for success. Students analyze theme and style across a variety of novels, informational texts, and technical documents. Students incorporate vocabulary, literary devices, and proper formatting into their own writing. Students engage in discussions that synthesize information from readings, other content areas, experiences, media, and current events.

Students use a variety of modalities to actively listen, participate, and learn from the teacher, as well as peers; furthermore, students respond appropriately and intellectually to demonstrate content mastery and higher-level inquiry. Questions, and follow-up questions, are used to clarify speaker points. When speaking individually and presenting in groups, students effectively incorporate audience appropriate tone, pacing, gestures, eye-contact, and use of technology/other visual aids. Above all, students apply learning to develop professional aspirations and prepare to be competitive, compassionate, global-thinkers in the technology-driven 21st Century.

 

English 10:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ENG 3 ADV / F156 , OCS ENG 4 ADV / F157 , ADV ENGLISH 10 / E210, ENGLISH 10 / E200

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

In order to prepare students to thrive on the PSATs, SATs, SAT IIs, ACTs, and CAHSEE by examining test formats and expectations in order to implement strategies for success. Students analyze theme and style across a variety of novels, informational texts, and technical documents. Students incorporate vocabulary, literary devices, and proper formatting into their own writing. Students engage in discussions that synthesize information from readings, other content areas, experiences, media, and current events.

Students use a variety of modalities to actively listen, participate, and learn from the teacher, as well as peers; furthermore, students respond appropriately and intellectually to demonstrate content mastery and higher-level inquiry. Questions, and follow-up questions, are used to clarify speaker points. When speaking individually and presenting in groups, students effectively incorporate audience appropriate tone, pacing, gestures, eye-contact, and use of technology/other visual aids. Above all, students apply learning to develop professional aspirations and prepare to be competitive, compassionate, global-thinkers in the technology-driven 21st Century.

 

Advanced English 9:

Transcript Abbreviations: Adv English 9 1  / 1948 , Adv English 9 2 / 1949, ADV ENGLISH 9 / E210

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 9th
UC Honors Designation? No

In order to prepare students for English 3,4 Advanced, Advanced Placement courses, and to be competitive at four-year university programs, English 1, 2 Advanced gives students the tools and support to listen actively, speak confidently, read critically, and write eloquently. Students analyze theme and style across a variety of novels and texts, incorporate vocabulary, literary devices, and proper formatting into their own writing. Students engage in discussions that synthesize information from readings, experiences, media, and current events. Students use a variety of modalities to actively listen, participate, and learn from the teacher, as well as peers; furthermore, students respond appropriately and intellectually to demonstrate content mastery and higher-level inquiry. Questions, and follow-up questions, are used to clarify speaker points. When speaking individually and presenting in groups, students effectively incorporate audience appropriate tone, pacing, gestures, eye-contact, and use of technology/other visual aids. Above all, students apply learning to develop professional aspirations and prepare to be competitive, compassionate, global-thinkers in the technology-driven 21st Century.

 

English 9:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ENGLISH 1 / F150 , OCS ENGLISH 2 / F151 , OCS ENGLISH 1 SH / F150L,  OCS ENGLISH 1 SH / F151L , ENGLISH 9 / E100 

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 9th
UC Honors Designation? No

English 1, 2 gives students the tools and support to listen actively, speak confidently, read critically, and write eloquently. Students analyze theme and style across a variety of novels and texts, incorporate vocabulary, literary devices, and proper formatting into their own writing. Students engage in discussions that synthesize information from readings, experiences, media, and current events. Students use a variety of modalities to actively listen, participate, and learn from the teacher, as well as peers; furthermore, students respond appropriately and intellectually to demonstrate content mastery and higher-level inquiry. Questions, and follow-up questions, are used to clarify speaker points. When speaking individually and presenting in groups, students effectively incorporate audience appropriate tone, pacing, gestures, eye-contact, and use of technology/other visual aids. Above all, students apply learning to develop professional aspirations and prepare to be competitive, compassionate, global-thinkers in the technology-driven 21st Century.

 

World Literature:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS World Lit / F171 , OCS World LIt / F172 , WORLD LIT / E400

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

World Literature and Composition at The O’Farrell Charter High School is a pivotal course that ensures that Grade 12 students are prepared to thrive at the university level and life beyond high school. Using the Common Core ELA standards for Grade 12 as a framework, World Literature and Composition stems from the rigorous American Literature curriculum but cultivates global awareness is students as they prepare for young adulthood. Students read texts rhetorically and challenge the assertions of fictional and informational texts. Students analyze themes across literary genres, history, and modern culture, identifying the humanizing struggles and triumphs that define the human
experience. In World Literature and Composition, students take great care to analyze author motivations and style, addressing bias and reflecting on their own writing styles, motivations, and points-of-view. Students read novels, articles, advertisements, and poems critically, and also write essays, research papers, business letters, professional emails, blogs, and website content to express dynamic ideas in diverse forums. Students draft, write, and refine college essays, scholarship application essays, and college-level essays with various prompts, many rooted in cross-curricular topics to give students writing tools that transfer to diverse, practical tasks. Students are expected to speak and write eloquently to express individual points-of-view, while citing textual evidence to build academic arguments. Consistent discussions, debates, and a public speaking unit require students to develop advanced communication skills and also to listen actively to peer assertions in order to respond appropriately. In each unit, students are expected to question and analyze content, pushing themselves to think critically about the world around them; students grapple with their identities as global citizens, discussing and defining who they are beyond the label of “American”.

 

Mathematics (“c”) 3 years required, 4 years recommended

 

AP Calculus AB:

Transcript Abbreviations: AP Calc AB / 429 , AP Calc AB / 430

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions. Before studying calculus, all students should complete the equivalent of four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students: courses which should prepare them with a strong foundation in reasoning with algebraic symbols and working with algebraic structures. Prospective calculus students should take courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary functions. These functions include linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and piecewise-defined functions. In particular, before studying calculus, students must be familiar with the properties of functions, the composition of functions, the algebra of functions, and the graphs of functions. Students must also understand the language of functions (domain and range, odd and even, periodic, symmetry, zeros, intercepts, and descriptors such as increasing and decreasing).

 

AP Calculus BC:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS AP CALC BC 1 / F435 , AP CALC BC / M700

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels:12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

 

Integrated Math I:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Integrated Math IA / 451 , OCS Integrated Math IB / 452 , OCS Integrated Math IA ADV / 453 , OCS Integrated Math IB ADV / 454 , INTEG MATH I / M100

Length of Course: Full year, Grade Levels: 9th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of Integrated Math 1 is to develop students’ ability to think mathematically and develop their conceptual understanding of mathematics and procedural fluency in mathematics. Integrated Math 1 will build upon and enhance the mathematics students have already learned in earlier grades and begin the development of concepts in Relationships between Quantities, Linear and Exponential Relationships, Reasoning with Equations, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, and Statistics needed for higher level mathematics courses. The use of real-world situations, graphs, manipulatives, models and diagrams will help students see the connections between different topics of mathematics. Through these many sources of learning the students will learn to solve problems through many different representations such as algebraically, numerically, graphically and verbally; and will be able to show how to solve by using more than one of these representations. Through this, students will see the connection of math being one topic instead of several unrelated topics. Students in this course will learn to use mathematical models to connect real world events and situations, and use algebraic reasoning to manipulate these models for deeper learning.

Integrated Math II:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Int. Math II A / 455 , OCS Int. Math II B / 456 , OCS ADV Int Math II A / 457 , OCS ADV Int Math II B / 458 , INTEG MATH II / M200

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

Integrated Mathematics II is a college preparatory class designed to incorporate and extend the accumulation of learning from middle school mathematics and Integrated Mathematics I. Students extend their understanding of linear equations from previous math courses to include quadratic expressions, equations and functions. Students are able to draw comparisons between linear and quadratic characteristics. Students further develop their Geometry understanding by exploring proofs, congruence, similarity and circles. The study of similarity supports students understanding of right triangle trigonometry. Probability and data are explored through counting methods and applications of probability. Students are able to make and evaluate decisions based on their probability understanding.

 

Integrated Math III:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Int. Math III A / 459 , OCS Int. Math III B / 460 , OCS Adv Int. Math III A / 461 , OCS Adv Int. Math III B / 462 , INTEG MATH III / M300

Length of Course: Full year , Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

Integrated Mathematics III is a college preparatory course designed to incorporate and extend the accumulation of learning from Mathematics Integrated I and II. Throughout the course students will synthesize their function understanding in order to: solve exponential equations with logarithms, explore various function graphs and the effect of given transformations as well as determine how to model a function for a given situation. Students extend their knowledge of statistics from earlier courses to relate different types of data and probability distributions. Students develop an advanced understanding that rational expressions are governed by the same rules as rational numbers.Students further develop their understanding of Trigonometry, specifically the Law of Sines and Cosines by extending their understanding past right triangles to general triangles.

 

Pre Calculus:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Pre Calc 1 / F425 , OCS Pre Calc 2 / F426 , PRECALC / M500

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of this course is to give students a strong foundation of advanced algebraic, graphical and numerical techniques for solving, analyzing and understanding functions, trigonometry and multivariable equations. This foundation prepares students for success in an AP Calculus course. Upon completion of this course students confidently analyze the properties of a variety of functions and appropriately model real-world scenarios and develop skills in supporting a selected model using the mathematical properties of the given function.

 

Statistics:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Statistics, STATS / M400

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 12
th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of this course is to introduce the subject of statistics as the science of data using mathematics. There is data abounding in the digital world which we live. How to extract useful information and gain an understanding in complex data sets has been more of a challenge. Throughout the course students will focus on the fundamentals of statistics, which may be broadly described as the techniques to collect, clarify, summarize, organize, analyze, and interpret numerical information.

To be more specific this course will go through four different parts of elementary statistics with students diving deep into each category. The class will be broken into four parts beginning with a quick focus on descriptive statistics, then it will move on to probability, followed be statistical inference, and finally end diving deeper into more statistical inference. Each part will show how statistics incorporates many different parts of mathematics and how statistics is used in real life situations and scenarios. This course will focus on the importance of statistics and how we use statistics in our everyday life.

 

Laboratory Science (“d”), 2 years required, 3 years recommended

 

Anatomy and Physiology:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Ant/Physiology 1 / F647, OCS Ant/Physiology 2 / F648 , ANAT/PHYS / S500

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 12
th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of this course is for students to construct an understanding how human organ systems interact with one another, for students to develop an appreciation of various current medical and health-related issues, and for students to develop their scientific inquiry, writing and presentation skills, all of which are needed should any of these students pursue science-related majors and/or careers. Specifically, students study the interactions of the digestive, neurological, cardiovascular (including respiratory), immune, muscular and skeletal systems. Throughout studying these interactions, students also investigate the role of biochemical molecules and hormones in maintaining homeostasis. All of this content, however, is correlated to current health-related issues such as emerging diseases, healthcare availability and affordability, mental illness, obesity, and malnutrition. Through this course, students develop an understanding of global health issues, expand the skills needed to critically think about such issues and learn how to collaborate with their peers to identify potential solutions to such issues. Finally, students refine their investigative and inquiry skills and are able to problem- solve, diagnose, and present (or write about) real case-studies and laboratory data. Students leave the anatomy and physiology course with an introduction into medical science.

 

AP Biology:

Transcript Abbreviations: AP Biology 1 / F609, AP Biology 2 / F610 , AP BIOLOGY / S700

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes — energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. This course requires that 25 percent of the instructional time will be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to apply the science practices. Students should have successfully completed high school courses in biology and chemistry. The course is based on four Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about living organisms and biological systems. The following are Big Ideas: The process of evolution explains the diversity and unity of life, Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. Living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes. Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

 

AP Physics 1:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS AP Physics / F635, OCS AP Physics / F636 , AP PHYSICS / S400

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational

motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. The AP Physics 1 course is designed to be taught over the course of a full academic year and may be taken as a first-year physics course with no prior physics course work necessary. Students should have completed geometry and be concurrently taking algebra II, or an equivalent course. Although the Physics 1 course includes basic use of trigonometric functions, this understanding can be gained either in the concurrent math course or in the AP Physics 1 course itself.

 

Biology:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Biology 1 / F609 , OCS Biology 2 / F610 , BIOLOGY / S200

Length of Course: Full year , Grade Levels: 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of this course is for students to construct an understanding how various biotic systems interact with one another and with the abiotic systems on Earth through predictable patterns that allow us to make models for the future. Through this course, students understand evolution by natural selection to be a common theme throughout biology and an underlying explanation for why life exists in the forms it does today. The course begins with exploration of the nature of life and then narrows to the most basic life form, the cell. From there, students investigate genetics for its role in transmitting cellular information from generation to generation. The course progresses to evolution and defines it in respect to all other aspects of biology. The course continues with an exploration of different kingdoms of organisms, beginning with microorganisms, transitioning to plants, to animals and finally to humans. The course concludes with a study of ecology, focusing mainly on the human impact on Earth’s sustainable future. The course emphasizes several big ideas namely the pattern of interdependence in nature, the maintenance of homeostasis, and evolution.

 

Chemistry:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS CHEMISTRY 1 / F621,G,L , OCS CHEMISTRY 2 / F621 G,L , CHEMISTRY / S300

Length of Course: Full year , Grade Levels: 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

This laboratory science course is designed to provide an in depth look at chemistry. Students are expected to apply their understanding of chemistry concepts to hands on laboratory experiments. From these experiences students must process the information, using quantitative data analysis, and arrive at conclusions that incorporate their results with the laws that govern the physical world. This course offers opportunities for students to utilize a variety of technology to communicate their findings.

 

Physics:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS PHYSICS 1 SH / F631L , OCS PHYSICS 1 / F631 , OCS PHYSICS 2 / F632, PHYSICS / S400

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

The purpose of Physics 1,2 is to provide students a general understanding of the fundamental physical laws that govern the universe. Using basic algebraic techniques, conceptualization and the scientific method, students develop an understanding of how the universe works and strategies used to solve scientific problems. There are six units of focus: motion, force, energy, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and waves. Students learn to predict and analyze the behavior of an object in motion during both constant and accelerated motion. Students understand the concept of kinematics through application of Newton’s Laws of Motion and Conservation of Energy and Momentum. Students continue their Conservation of Energy understanding by learning the fundamentals of the Laws of Thermodynamics. Students connect the physical properties of electrically charged particles to everyday experiences by analyzing electrical circuits and applying Ohm’s Law. Their understanding of electricity is augmented by learning the relationship between the motion of charged particles and magnetism. Students are introduced to optical devices such as mirrors, lenses and polarizers and they investigate how these devices affect the physical properties of electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum.

 

Physics 1,2 Advanced:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS PHYS 1 ADV SH / F633L , OCS PHYS 1 ADV / F633 , OCS PHYS 2 ADV / F634 , OCS PHYS 2 ADV SH / F634L

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The purpose of Advanced Physics is to provide students an in-depth understanding of the fundamental physical laws that govern the universe. Using advanced algebraic techniques and the scientific method, students develop strategies used to solve complex scientific problems. There are six primary topics of focus: motion, force, energy, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and waves. Students learn to predict and analyze the behavior of an object in motion during both constant and accelerated motion. Students investigate the concept of kinematics through understanding and application of Newton’s Laws of Motion and Conservation of Energy and Momentum. Students further their Conservation of Energy understanding and problem-solving skills through investigation and experimentation of the Laws of Thermodynamics. Students connect the physical properties of electrically charged particles to everyday experiences by analyzing electrical circuits and applying Ohm’s Law. Their understanding of electricity is further enhanced by examining the relationship between the motion of charged particles and magnetism, and how the physical properties of electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum are manipulated through optical devices such as mirrors, lenses and polarizers. Students enhance their ability to utilize the scientific method by performing experiments that they design and analyze. Students derive fundamental equations by analyzing and interpreting data that is collected during investigations.

 

Investigation and Experimentation:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Invest/Exp. 1 / F641 , OCS Invest/Exp. 2 / F642 , INVEST/EXP / S100

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th
UC Honors Designation? No

In this course students will work towards a thorough understanding of the methods that scientists and engineers employ in investigating questions and developing solutions; gain experience in learning through inquiry and become self-reliant and independent learners and problem solvers; acquire enhanced familiarity with designing and conducting experiments in the scientific fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and Earth science; hone expository and technical written and verbal communication skills and improve their skill at reading technical non-fictional text (scientific publications, instructional manuals etc.).

 

Languages Other than English (“e”) 2 years required, 3 years recommended

 

AP Spanish Language and Culture:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS SPN LNG 1 AP / F231 , F231 / OCS SPN LANG 1 AP , F232 / OCS SPN LANG 2 AP , AP SPANISH LNG / L400

Length of Course: Full year

Grade Levels: 10th,11th,12th

UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course uses a thematic approach to introduce students to representative texts (short stories, novels, poetry, and essays) from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and United States Hispanic literature. Students develop proficiencies across the full range of communication modes (interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive), thereby honing their critical reading and analytical writing skills. Literature is examined within the context of its time and place, as students reflect on the many voices and cultures present in the required readings. The course also includes a strong focus on cultural connections and comparisons, including exploration of various media (e.g., art, film, articles, literary criticism).

 

French I: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: FRENCH I / L110

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe

and across the globe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

French II: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: FRENCH II / L210

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery,etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas across the globe, and assessments. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

French III: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS French 3

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

In this expanding engagement with French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in French, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase items (virtual clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Continuing the pattern, and building on what students encountered in the first two years, each week consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major French-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

German I: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: GERMAN I / L130

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

German II: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS German 2

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students continue their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. As students begin the course, they construct their own Avatar that accumulates “Avatar bucks”—by performing well on course tasks—to use to purchase materials (clothing, gadgets, scenery, etc.) at the “Avatar store”. Each week consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major German-speaking areas in Europe. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).

 

Spanish 1/2:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS SPANISH 1 / F221 , OCS SPANISH 2 / F222 , SPANISH 1/2 / L100

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th,11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

The Spanish 1 course is designed as an introductory for students wishing to learn a second language at the beginning level and will promote achievement in the future study of Spanish in their high school career. In this course students will develop basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. The development of these skills will encourage students to communicate in target language about the topics of family and friends, foods, traveling, sports and shopping in the present and past actions. This course also includes an exploration of cultural lessons of various Spanish speaking countries. Students will be able to compare and contrast the cultures studied with their own, recognize differences between Spanish speaking cultures and respect their practices, and finally recall different celebrations in Spanish speaking countries. At the end of the year, the objective is for students in Spanish 1 to utilize learned content in a Spanish speaking country. Furthermore, students learn the importance in learning a second language as a benefit in the career market as well as, improving their own English language skills and appreciating other cultures.

 

Spanish 3/4:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Spanish 4 / F224 , OCS Spanish 3 / F223 , SPANISH 3/4 / L200

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th,10th
UC Honors Designation? No

The Spanish 2 course is designed for high school students to advance their understand from novice to intermediate after completing Spanish 1. In this course, students build on their skills with speaking, listening, reading and writing. The continuing development of these skills encourage students to communicate in target language about the topics of family and friends, foods, traveling, sports, daily routines, celebrations, technology, and health in multiple verb tenses. Along with verb conjugations, students continue to develop vocabulary skills through oral and written exercises and apply mastered vocabulary to formulate complex sentences and short paragraphs in written and oral form. Students build listening and speaking skills through audio CDs/videos/ and face to face communication with teacher and/or peers through classroom activities. Students learn to speak in the preterite, conditional, imperfect, and subjunctive tenses. Students also continue to study culture in Spanish- speaking countries.

 

Spanish 5/6:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Span 5 / F225 , OCS Span 6 / F226 , SPANISH 5/6 / L300

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th
UC Honors Designation? No

Level three is a continuing course for students who have completed their Spanish 3/4 requirement with a C or higher. This course is designed to communicate in Spanish in real-life situations. In this course students develop advance skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Each chapter in study helps build a relationship between the vocabulary words and grammar to support students in creating a comprehensible Spanish dialogue. Students communicate in target language through guided grammar activities along with a better understanding of Hispanic cultural topics. This course emphasizes the use of active communication conducted in target language (Spanish) by teacher to prepare students for the AP Spanish and Language course or other college placement test. The major units of study include: vocabulary development, verb conjugations and the subjunctive moods and daily practice in both oral and listening activities.

At this level, students are taught to build listening and speaking skills at an advanced level through audio CDs/videos/ and open-ended communicative tasks with teacher and/or peer through classroom activities. Through the use of media, students are exposed to the target language and exposed to respond according to what they hear and see through the use of verbs and vocabulary words in study. Students will also use technology to build Power Points and conduct research to write short papers in target language.

 

Spanish I: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: SPANISH I / L120

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of
Foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The High School Spanish I course helps students: Engage in language learning, Master common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, Instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

Spanish II: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: SPANISH II / L320

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of
Foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The High School Spanish II course helps students: Engage in language learning, master common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

Spanish III: Adopted from Edgenuity, Inc

Transcript Abbreviations: SPANISH II / L320

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Online Format

In this expanding engagement with Spanish, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition, students read significant works of literature in Spanish, and respond orally or in writing to these works. The course consists of 180 lesson days formatted in an intuitive calendar view, which can be divided into two 90-day semesters and represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. The High School Spanish III course helps students: Engage in language learning, master common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, instigate and continue simple conversations, and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, generate language incorporating basic vocabulary and a limited range of grammar patterns, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and regularly assess progress in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions

 

Visual & Performing Arts (“f”), 1 year required

 

21st Century Yearbook Design and Publication: (2016-2017 school year)

Transcript Abbreviations: Yearbook / X240

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

21st Century Yearbook Design and Publication is a year long project-based course designed to have students create publication mediums that directly impact society and its various cultures, through visual art and design. Students will use creativity and the artistic process of creating layouts and designs to put together and publish the yearbook. The designer (student) will prove their awareness of their target audience while maintaining integrity of their design, photographs, edits and written work. Designers will then edit other student's work for content, design, originality and ethics. They will collaborate to effectively create and deliver a finished product.

 

Introduction to Photography:

Transcript Abbreviations: Photography 1 / F021 , Photography 2 / F022 , PHOTOGRAPHY / V100

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th
UC Honors Designation? No

Students are introduced to the basic technology necessary for the production of their artwork; as well as learning about the visual arts; how to look at and critique photography; photographic vocabulary; using tools such as framing, composition, "rule of thirds", light, texture, pattern, lines, symmetry, depth of field, distance, perspective, culture, space, balance, color and black and white photography; and be introduced to many works by well-known

photographers. Students practice portraits, composing photo essays, portraiture, and learn about commercial applications for photography skills. Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to use the tools competently in the production of their art work, however, the production and analysis of expressive and thoughtful artwork is the main objective of this course.

 

Theater:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Theater 1 / F140 , OCS Theater 2 / F141 , THEATER / V110

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th , 11th
UC Honors Designation? No

The objective of this course is to have a student internalize a variety of tools that ensures a strong foundation that prepares students to use, acquire, refine, and polish theatrical skills needed for a successful transition to university level courses and participate in theatrical events in the global community. To reach this goal, students must process, analyze, and respond to vocabulary, written theatrical works both classic and contemporary, live theatrical works, historical background and content, as well as the various roles within the theater and their importance to the arts as a
whole. Students gain knowledge about the historical and cultural origins of theater to synthesize information to promote higher level thinking using a variety of modalities. In addition to cultivating a performing arts culture, this class implements a variety of strategies that allows the student to develop, create, perform, and participate in various theatrical activities as well as respond to, analyze, and make critical assessments about performances and other theatrical works. The skills obtained in this class correlate a relationship with the skills and strategies learned in this course to strengthen skills that involve writing applications such as expository, persuasive, poetic, investigative, analytical, as well as workplace documents to condition students to participate at the university level and to enter into the workforce thereafter.

 

Theater 3/4:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Theater 3 / F142 , OCS Theater 4 / F143 , THEATER / V110

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

The objective of this course is to have a student internalize a variety of tools that ensures a strong foundation that prepares students to use, acquire, refine, and polish theatrical skills needed for a successful transition to university level courses and participate in theatrical events in the global community. To reach this goal, students must process, analyze, and respond to vocabulary, written theatrical works both classic and contemporary, live theatrical works, historical background and content, as well as the various roles within the theater and their importance to the arts as a
whole. Students gain knowledge about the historical and cultural origins of theater to synthesize information to promote higher level thinking using a variety of modalities. In addition to cultivating a performing arts culture, this class implements a variety of strategies that allows the student to develop, create, perform, and participate in various theatrical activities as well as respond to, analyze, and make critical assessments about performances and other theatrical works. The skills obtained in this class correlate a relationship with the skills and strategies learned in this course to strengthen skills that involve writing applications such as expository, persuasive, poetic, investigative, analytical, as well as workplace documents to condition students to participate at the university level and to enter into the workforce thereafter.

 

Theatrical Design:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS THEATRE DSGN 1 / F144 , OCS THEATRE DSGN 2 / F145 , THEATER DSGN / V200

Length of Course: Full year

Grade Levels: 9th. 10th, 11th, 12th

UC Honors Designation? No

The objective of the Theatrical Design course is to focus on the organizational demands, creative ingenuity, and collaborative methods essential for theater production. Theatrical design consists of four components: 1) study the history of theater through researching, viewing, and reading play productions 2) working collaboratively to plan, design, prioritize and set deadlines in crews to meet directional goals for each play production 3) learn all backstage crew positions and master aspects of costume, lighting, set, and sound 4) utilizing problem-solving skills in productions by evaluating the effectiveness of formal or in-formal productions, films, or videos. This course is designed for a successful transition to university level theater courses, as well as participation in theatrical events in the global community. To reach this goal, students must also process, analyze, and respond to vocabulary, written theatrical works both classic and contemporary, live theatrical works, historical background and content, as well as the various roles within the theater and their importance to the arts as a whole. Students gain knowledge about the historical and cultural origins of theater to synthesize information to promote higher-level thinking using a variety of modalities.

 

College-Preparatory Elective (“g”), 1 year required

 

Advanced Computer Science:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ADV COMP SCI 1 / F466 , OCS ADV COMP SCI 2 / F467

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 10
th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

This course is designed to provide the student with the analytical and logic skills to understand and apply computational logic and processes to the understanding and use of basic programming (using Alice), provoke higher level thought and communication as reverent issues such as privacy and ownership are explored, and the ability to explain the logic behind basic sequencing of functions in programs such as Excel. The emphasis in this course is the ability of the student to understand the logic behind the actions of the computer, the evaluative skills to understand the varying views on of the ethical use of computing, the analytical skills to be able to explain the logic or the errors in the logic, and the communication skills to explain the logic to peers and instructors. This course is rigorous and rich in computational content, and includes computational and critical thinking and skills, while engaging students in the creative aspects of the field. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience.

 

Advanced Economics:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS ECON ADV / F678 , ADV ECON / H420

Length of Course: Half year
Grade Levels: 12
th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The objective of this course is for students to master the fundamentals of economics and practice applying the concepts in diverse situations. Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned manner in evaluating and explaining personal, community, national and global economic issues. They will use measurement concepts and create/ work with tables, charts, graphs, ratios, percentages and index numbers to understand and interpret relevant data. They should learn to make reasoned decisions on economics issues as citizens, workers, consumers, business owners, managers and members of civic groups. At the honors level students also engage in additional higher level thinking tasks with the concepts, investigate and apply more advanced resources (such as supplementary articles and texts not used in the college preparatory course), and complete additional projects synthesizing ideas and concepts from throughout the course.

 

AP Computer Science Principles:

Transcript Abbreviations: AP COMP SCI PR / X320

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? Yes

The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.

 

AVID 12:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS SR HI AVID / F823,F824 , AVID / X210 Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11th, 12th

UC Honors Designation? No

AVID is offered as an elective course that, like any other regular class, meets five hours per week. Students receive two hours of instruction per week in college entry level skills, two hours per week in tutor led study groups, and one hour per week in motivational activities and academic survival skills. During students’ senior year, they may take honors courses or other elective courses such as newspaper or yearbook staff, or Associated Student Body classes for four hours per week and their AVID class one hour per week. The AVID elective may also be offered on an Independent Study option or as the University of California “G” requirement.

 

College and Career Development:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS CAREER DEVL 1 / F912 , OCS CAREER DEVL 2 / F913 , CAREER DEVEL / X200

Length of Course: Full year

Grade Levels: 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

College and Career Development is designed to prepare students for life after high school, be that community college, college, or the job force. Through a variety of modules, students research colleges and career paths, formulating a plan and purpose for after graduation. Through research, job simulations, speeches, projects, and diverse writing tasks, students analyze their strengths, passions, skills, and academic interests, articulating why their plan for after high school suits those characteristics. Students learn MLA and APA format, catalog organization and study strategies, engage with college and job search tools, and develop public speaking and interview skills.

 

Computers:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS COMPUTERS / F445 , OCS COMPUTERS / F446 , OCS COMP/APP/MUS / F445, OCS COMP/APP/MUS / F446 , COMPUTER / X300

Length of Course: Full year Grade Levels: 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th

UC Honors Designation? No

This introductory computers course gives students a comprehensive overview of how to effectively use iMac and PC hardware and software. Students look at the hardware, delving into the history of how the technology evolved and the notable individuals that drove the innovation. Students debate the whether the benefits offset the challenges of technology, and explore related ethical issues. Students learn to use Google tools, Adobe software, and a range of websites to enhance academic assignments, support professional goals, and facilitate digital literacy and design abilities.

 

 

Engineering 1:

Transcript Abbreviations: F351 / OCS Prn Enginr 1 , F352 / OCS Prn Enginr 2 , ENGINEER PRN 1 / X250

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th ,10th , 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Engineering 1 will introduce students to the Engineering process and prepare them for the more technically
focused Engineering 2. It is a project based learning course in which students solve problems through research, design, building and testing. Students will learn and apply scientific, statistical and mathematical concepts in completing their project units. Special attention will be paid to reading and understanding the parameters of problems and solutions (rules) and in formal planning of proposed solutions before testing.

 

 

 

Journalism:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Journalism 1 / F181 , OCS Journalism 2 / F182 , JOURNALISM / X230

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 11
th , 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

This course introduces students to the principles of Journalism, prepares students for AP Journalism/college level courses, and exposes students to careers in various fields of Journalism. The class teaches students to brainstorm, research, interview, draft, edit, layout, format, and publish the school newspaper, working within the style and structure of the different sections of “The Kaleidoscope”- The O’Farrell High School Newspaper. Students learn the unique characteristics and ethical implications of reporting and also analyze bias in the news. Additionally, students distinguish between different mediums (television, radio, newspaper, blog, vlog, magazine, Internet, etc.) that journalists use and discuss the function and effectiveness of each. Legal issues and advertising considerations are also studied. Students develop digital competence, editing text and images using Adobe InDesign and Photoshop software. Finally, students gain a breadth and depth of knowledge on current events and make intelligent, cross-curricular connections to contextualize their learning and articulate information about the world around them.

 

 

Journalism 3/4:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Journ 3 / F183 , OCS Journ 4 / F184

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 10
th , 11th , 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

This course builds on Journalism 1/2, preparing students for AP Journalism/college level courses, and exposes students to careers in various fields of Journalism. The course also supports Common Core ELA Curriculum, requiring students to read, write, speak, and listen critically in every unit. The class teaches students to brainstorm, research, interview, draft, edit, layout, format, and publish the school newspaper, working within the style and structure of the different sections of “The Kaleidoscope”, the O’Farrell High School Newspaper. Students take an in depth look at the role of photography in communicating a story; this goes hand-in-hand with the task of structuring, designing, and editing the annual High School Yearbook. Students must handle deadlines, event coverage, pricing, publicity, and distribution of the Yearbook.

Students go more in depth on the business side of Journalism, corresponding with advertisers and handling
finances. Students gain a breadth and depth of knowledge on current events and make intelligent, cross-curricular connections to contextualize their learning and articulate information about the world around them. This course integrates iconic films and documentaries about Journalism, in order to broach complex legal and ethical issues that journalists
face. Students demonstrate critical thinking through essays, discussions, debates, articles, and multimedia presentations in order to substantiate their own viewpoints with evidence from history and the world in which they live.

 

Leadership Service Learning:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS SERV LRNG / F880 , SERV LRNG / X270

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th ,10th , 11th , 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

This course gives students a foundation in leadership principles to be applied to high school and beyond. Using The Art of War by Sun Tzu as a framework, students navigate the art of planning for, communicating with, and motivating diverse groups of people. Students explore historical and modern leaders, analyzing effectiveness and commonalities. In building public speaking skills and getting hands on experience with marketing and event planning, students learn to problem solve, work well with others, and assume responsibility. Students also explore the ethics of leadership and the care required when in charge of different tasks. Finally, students explore the world of entrepreneurship and college expectations and opportunities in this field. This class supports ELA Common Core curriculum, integrating critical reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks in every unit.

 

Principles of Economics:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS Prin of Econ / F676 , PRN OF ECON / H410

Length of Course: Half year
Grade Levels: 12
th
UC Honors Designation? No

12th grade students are close to entering the adult world. The study of economic principles and concepts is vital to their informed and successful participation in the financial world as laborers, consumers, investors, and entrepreneurs. In completing this course, students understand: what economics is and how understanding economics can benefit them personally; the underlying decision making processes that drive our world; how businesses are organized; the relationship of supply, demand and price; how economies are measured on a macro level; how to differentiate between types of economic problems and what causes them; the role of the Federal Government in monetary and fiscal policy; how international trade relationships affect our economy; and economic challenges of the future and in other parts of the world. Students apply mathematical relationships and statistical processes to data using economic principles Students think critically about issues and create solutions to hypothetical economic problems, communicate through discussion of current events through an economic lens, read grade level appropriate text, write to communicate higher level thinking, and analyze graphs, charts and tables to draw conclusions.

 

Principles of Engineering:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS PRN ENGINR 3 / F353 , OCS PRN ENGINR 4 / F354 , ENGINEER PRN 2 / X260

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 10
th, 11th,12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Principles of Engineering 3,4 is an extension of the foundational course Principles of Engineering 1,2. In this course students further their ability to apply the engineering design process, as well as analyzing their designs based on their knowledge of several physical principles. Students are challenged in a variety of collaborative projects to demonstrate their creativity, teamwork and attention to detail. Students explore several areas of engineering including structural engineering, alternative energy, aerodynamics and electrical engineering.

 

Yearbook: (2015-2015, 2015-2016 school year)

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS PUBL 1 / F161, OCS PUBL 2 / F162  

Length of Course: Full year
Grade Levels: 9
th, 10th, 11th, 12th
UC Honors Designation? No

Yearbook Design and Publication is a year long project-based course designed to have students create publication mediums that directly impact society and its various cultures, through visual art and design. Students will use creativity and the artistic process of creating layouts and designs to put together and publish the yearbook. The designer (student) will prove their awareness of their target audience while maintaining integrity of their design, photographs, edits and written work. Designers will then edit other student's work for content, design, originality and ethics. They will collaborate to effectively create and deliver a finished product.

 

Physical Education Courses

 

Crossfit:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS X-FIT / F563 , OCS X-FIT 2 / F564, X-FIT / X120

 

Strength and Conditioning:

Transcript Abbreviations:  OCS PERSONAL FIT 1 / F565, OCS PERSONAL FIT 2 / F566, CONDITIONING / X130

 

Independent Study Physical Education:

Transcript Abbreviations: OCS PE/IND STUD 1 / F561, OCS PE/IND STUD 2 / F562, IND STU/PE / X110